Friday, October 30, 2009

Harvest Time in Illinois

Harvest time is over for our kitchen gardens but the harvest of the corn and soybean crops is just begining

This has been a very, very wet and cold summer. The corn needs heat to develop properly and hopefully it's gotten enough. You would be shocked if you knew just how much corn we produce in this state. It's an awesome site to watch the harvest. Here is a photo from a couple of years ago. The corn is being offloaded at the edge of the field. It will be transported to a grain elevator where it will be stored.



Here's a big rig driving through the open field. It's quite a sight.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Of course you realize that the American heartland literally feeds the world and the farmer's plant in every possible nook and cranny. I've seen corn or soybean planted in twisting patterns around telephone poles or any other fixed feature. They plant every possible seed in every possible place.

The fall has been very rainy. We're all searching for plans for an ark. The rain will delay the harvest. The corn can only be harvested when it's moisture content is low. If you put high moisture corn in a grain elevator it will simply mold and rot. The grain elevators and silos all have fans that remove any moist air when the corn is stored.

Here's a photo from earlier this week.



It was a very grey day but at least it wasn't raining. The farmer took the opportunity to harvest some of the field. This very small acreage is tucked between a housing subdivision and a "lifestyle" mall. Yes, our community has an identity problem. Are we rural or are we chic? Heck, we're both!

Just behind the trucks and harvester you'll see the back of the mall buildings. Just a short distance to the right is this:



Yes!!! Our very own Coach handbag store. I've only been in there once. I was a bit intimidated because I certainly don't have the wardrobe that would be appropriate for walking into a Coach store, but the staff was very nice and friendly. They didn't seem to give a hoot if I was wearing jeans with a few paint stains.

I'l have to admit to some serious sticker shock.

Anyway, I just thought you might like a peek into what's involved in getting in the crop. This is just a small snapshot.


18 comments:

mimi said...

Very enjoyable. A nice change for me from my usual and I have been enjoying reading your older posts. Thanks for sharing your life.

Karen Deborah said...

We have had a very weird summer as well out here in cotton, soybean, corn country too. It's been plenty hot but it has rained and rained and rained. From what I hear our farmers are in trouble too.

I do not get it when it comes to high dollar handbags; just don't get it.

I have a question for you. I check out the book, Julie/Julia that the movie is made from. There is a ton of cussing in this book. the story content is a surprise to me because it's not really what i expected. Very little of Julia Child and a whole lot of Julies weird sex ideas and fantasies. Her kitchen sounds so nasty I wouldn't eat a bite. Meryl Strep would not play a bit role, so the movie must have been different. You saw it and liked it, how about if you check out the book and see what you think? Was the movie full of the f*** word?

LydaBabes Going Ons!!!! said...

I have to tell you it is all your fault. I ordered Interweave crochet.....why'd you do this to me. Now I want to make something.....and I want to make that afghan.....so now I wait for the issue. They didn't have it at Barnes. Yes the farmers are late this year. It has been raining here too.....But the leaves are beautiful and the grape area is great..... I make all my own purses. I just refuse to be captured by the snob bug....desiner purses. For what they want it best have the cow with it....hahaha..... Don't you just love Illionis......

cityfarmer said...

hopefully the price per bushel is enough to purchase a coach bag ...


this was a common sight where I come from ...
minius the gold coast shopping

Cottage Rose said...

Hi Suzanne; I remember when my Uncle had his farm and I would go with him and my dad when he would harvest his fields. I had so much fun... hope you have a great weekend

Hugs;
Alaura

Old Centennial Farmhouse said...

Hi! Love your harvest pictures...and it reminds me that AMERICANS CAN GET IT DONE! We are the best, and we feed a whole bunch of the world. Our weather this summer was strange, very cold, wet and not a ton of sunshine! And fall has been the same, I feel like it's November already!
XOXO
Joni

Kat said...

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society arrived in the mail today.
You have the MOST amazing handwriting! How/where/when did you learn that skill. I'm just in awe!
Also, I just finished reading two very depressing books--Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince and All the Pretty Horses. This book is just the bright spot I needed.
Thanks so much for the giveaway. I can't wait to pass it along when I'm done.

lisa said...

I would try an outlet store if you wanted a Coach bag. There is still sticker shock, but not as much when you look at the full retail price. Not that I have one because I don’t. I just can’t get over either price.

Anonymous said...

We are waiting for it to dry up here in Michigan. We only have a few acres of beans harvested, so once it does dry up I am sure we will be very busy-hubby and son both have full time off farm jobs-they are threatening to teach me to drive the combine, which I think is way too big! Enjoyed your pictures and your blog.
Pam

Stickhorsecowgirls said...

There is something so very comforting about all things having to do with harvest. Must be in our DNA code; something to do with innate need for security (am I getting too deep?) I love seeing the grain and fields of hay bales and jars of preserved food! Thanks for sharing C

Thirkellgirl said...

They're bailing hay around here right now. One farm up the road still bails in rectangular bales, but everybody else does the huge round bales. Other local fields have sunflowers, cabbages, brussel sprouts, and what we call "cow corn," that they won't harvest until much later for sileage. The vineyard up the road has covered all the grapes that are left with netting; they let it freeze and make an expensive "iceling" wine (like a riessling, made with the grapes that have frozen on the vine). In other news, the full quota of bears has been hunted in western Maryland, and the Canadian geese are flying over every morning and evening. Love your photos!

Thirkellgirl said...

To Karen - I was shocked by the amount of f-words in the book, too! In fact, I just threw the book *out, because I didn't want to pass it on to anyone else. Interested in hearing about the movie, too... but it can't possibly be like the book, can it?

Thirkellgirl said...

Oh, phooey, I know how to spell "baling." No "i."

Farmchick said...

Nice photos of the harvest time in your area. I have only been in a Coach store a couple of times. I almost passed out.

BittersweetPunkin said...

Hi there Miss Suzanne. I grew up on a farm and harvest is fascinating...I love all those country smells. (the good ones)lol

I was just at your ETSY shop...snapped up a toile wallet for my niece for Christmas.:)

Hugs,
Robin

Linda said...

Suzanne, Thanks for this post. I love it when you post "on-the-ground" news of what's going on in rural Illinois, a place I have never had an opportunity to see--hopefully some day! It is interesting to hear about the harvest, and I can see how incredibly mechanized it is. Take care.

kanishk said...

enjoyable. A nice change for me from my usual and I have been enjoying reading your older posts Work from home India

free dating online said...

This is awesome..life in the country has always been part of my options..although, the city lief remained tempting.